Yes, Vision Does Change as We Age

Photo: American Optometric Association

Photo: American Optometric Association

You’re getting older. You’re noticing that colors aren’t as bright or rich as they used to be. The words in your books are a little blurrier. Your eyes dry out. Well, this is normal as we age. But that doesn’t mean there’s nothing you can do! Newton Eye Care Center can help with all these conditions. Call us at (989) 667-9393.

Learn to Spot Vision Problems in Children

Photo: FoxNews.com

Photo: FoxNews.com

As adults, we can detect problems with our own vision, but do you know what to look for in children? Do you know the age that kids should start receiving eye exams? This FoxNews.com article provides great insight. Such as, symptoms of strabismus include a visible crossing or wandering of the eye. Spotting vision problems early in a child’s life can play a crucial role in preserving his or her eyesight. Contact Newton Eye Care Center at (989) 667-9393 to schedule an appointment for your child.

Learn 5 Ways Makeup Can Damage the Eyes

Photo: TheStar.com

Photo: TheStar.com

Millions of women put on eye makeup every day. Seems harmless enough, but makeup can lead to eye damage if care is not taken. Among the ways makeup can damage eyes:

  • Bacterial infections
  • Toxic heavy metals
  • Dry eyes
  • Allergic reactions
  • Eyelash loss

Want to know how to prevent these problems? Check out this article. Are you experiencing any of these issues? Contact us today at (989) 667-9393.

Learn 8 Tips for Maintaining Eye Health

Blueberries contain antioxidants, which are good for your eyes.

Blueberries contain antioxidants, which are good for your eyes.

Are you doing everything you can to maintain good eye health? Here’s a checklist of tips that can help:

1. Wear UV protection in sunglasses and eyeglasses, and wear broad spectrum sunscreen on face.

2. Practice good hygiene with contact lenses.

3. Wear safety glasses or other eye protection for work or play.

4. Eat green, leafy vegetables and foods rich in antioxidants.

5. Don’t smoke.

6. Engage in regular aerobic exercise.

7. Control your weight.

8. See a doctor.

Want to know more? Check out this article.

Regular checkups are also a must. Is it time for yours? Contact Newton Eye Care Center today at (989) 667-9393 for an appointment.

Routine Eye Exam Reveals Dangerous Brain Tumor

Photo: Cascade News, via DailyMail.co.uk

Photo: Cascade News, via DailyMail.co.uk

At Newton Eye Care Center, we remind our patients to keep up on routine eye exams. We do this, of course, to maintain your best vision, but we also do it because these exams can also reveal other health problems. Consider the story of 10-year-old Lauren Uncles in Britain: She went to her local optician for prescription sunglasses but during her eye examination, the optometrist spotted swelling behind her optic nerve. She was diagnosed with a brain tumor that could have caused blindness or even death. Want to know more about Lauren’s story? Check out this DailyMail.co.uk article. Time for your own checkup? Contact us today at (989) 667-9393.

Learn Ways to Keep Computer Screens from Ruining Your Eyes

NewtonComputerMany of us stare at computer screens all day, and that puts tremendous strain on our eyes. There are steps we can take, however, to reduce that strain, such as cleaning our monitor screens, changing document fonts and employing the 20-20-20 rule. Want to know what that is? Check out this Huffington Post article. Need some relief for your tired eyes? We can help. Contact us at (989) 667-9393 to make an appointment.

What Do Newborns See? We Have the Answers

NewbornEyes

Ah, newborns. There’s nothing like peering into their little eyes. But what do those eyes see looking back at us? Not as much as you might think. The eye’s light-sensitive retina is not fully mature at birth, and it lacks a structure called the fovea at its center that gives us our sharp central vision. Actually, it’s not until age 2 months that babies begin to use both eyes together to see objects in three dimensions. Want to know more? Check out this BostonGlobe.com article.

 

Short-Sighted? Beautiful, Big Eyes Could Be to Blame

Photo: Chris Winter, Dailymail.co.uk

Photo: Chris Winter, Dailymail.co.uk

Got big, beautiful eyes? They might make you the envy of your peers, but they also might give you bad vision. Experts say big peepers might actually be a cause of short-sightedness, or myopia. This condition causes distant objects to appear blurred, while close ones can be seen clearly. It is caused by light not properly reaching the retina, the light- sensitive area at the back of the eye. Experts believe this might be because the eyeball grows too large, which causes the light to focus in front of the retina, rather than on it. Want to know more? Check out this Daily Mail article. Having trouble with short-sightedness? We can help. Give us a call at (989) 667-9393 today.

Child’s Vision is Crucial to Developing Many Life Skills

Photo: Parenthood.com

As kids head back to school this week, it’s important to note what a crucial role their eyes play in their overall development. “From birth, children are developing the ability to attend to visual stimulus, fixate their vision on items and faces, and track them in space. These abilities allow them to locate items that they will learn to reach for and grasp, or look at and smile,” according to this Missoulian.com article. Need to know what ages are appropriate for your child’s visits to the eye doctor? Contact us today. We are happy to give you the guidelines for your child’s optimal eye health.

 

Video: Learn How Your Eyes, Brain Work Together

Photo: Spacecollective.org

Photo: Spacecollective.org

Did you know that your eyes and brain don’t work in real-time? Your brain actually has to take a “shortcut” and compensate for slow vision. Pretty fascinating, huh? Learn more about how your brain and eyes work together by watching this VancouverSun.com video. Are your eyes giving your brain the right information? Schedule an eye examination at Newton Eye Care Center by calling (989) 667-9393.